Titled “Further findings linking SSRIs during pregnancy and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: clinical implications.”, this article appearing in the October, 2012 edition of CNS Drugs by M. Galbally et al., identifies persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) as a potential consequence of SSRI exposure before birth.

Galbally et al.

In 2009, S. Alwan and J.M. Friedman, a research duo from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, published a study titled “Safety of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy.” in CNS Drugs that provided important insight into the link between gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (such as Prozac,

Here, I present two studies I read this morning concerning the connection between prenatal SSRI exposure and adverse perinatal outcomes.  selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs) are widely used for a range of psychiatric ailments from depression to anxiety and work by regulating the concentration of serotonin molecules in the synapses between neurons.  Serotonin is

Over the past two decades, a number of scientific studies have demonstrated that exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs) can have adverse effects on a developing fetus.  Here, I’ll reference a pair of European studies that cite these adverse effects.

First, an article titled “[Withdrawal symptoms in a neonate following exposure

A study titled “Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine during pregnancy in term and preterm neonates.” published in the January, 2007 edition of Pediatrics by E. Ferreira et al. made great strides in elucidating the connection between preterm birth and gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or Effexor (venlafaxine).

The

An article published in the October, 2010 edition of Canadian Journal of Psychiatry by a team of researchers from Pfizer (Canada), led by É. Ramos, titled “Association between antidepressant use during pregnancy and infants born small for gestational age.” that sheds light on the connection between gestational exposure to SSRI drugs and low

Published in May, 2009 in Pharmacopsychiatry by a team of Australian researchers led by J. Rampono, an article titled “Placental transfer of SSRI and SNRI antidepressants and effects on the neonate.” provides further evidence that drugs such as Celexa, Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Effexor and others may cross the placenta and affect a

In 2010, an article published in Canadian Medical Association Journal titled “Use of antidepressants during pregnancy and the risk of spontaneous abortion.” illustrated the link between SSRI use during pregnancy and increased risk for spontaneous abortion.

This study, led by H.R. Nakhai-Pour of The University of Montreal, “obtained data from the Quebec Pregnancy

A recent article by P. Broy et al. published in Current Drug Delivery titled “Gestational exposure to antidepressants and the risk of spontaneous abortion: a review.” provides important insight into the connection between in vitro exposure to SSRI drugs and spontaneous abortion.  SSRI drugs are a relatively new class of antidepressant medications, which