In recent years, a great deal of research has been published linking Lipitor (atorvastatin) use and new onset diabetes.  Unfortunately, Lipitor warning labels have inadequately represented these risks, and a number of Lipitor diabetes lawsuits have been filed.  Lipitor (atorvastatin) is in a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs called “statins,” and are among the world’s most widely prescribed.  Atorvastatin is one of the most powerful in this group.  Here, I summarize a few studies I read today concerning statin drugs and diabetes.  For more studies about Lipitor and diabetes, follow the preceding link.

First, a study titled “Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.” by G.B. Mancini and a team of researchers from Vancouver, published in the December, 2013 edition of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology.  Here, researchers state, “The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy.” (emphasis added)

Clearly, diabetes was a well-known risk of statin use at the time.  Mancini et al. (2013) also note that compared to the statin effect on cognition, “the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm.”

Next, a study by DH Katz et al. published in the April, 2014 edition of Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, titled “Addressing Statin Adverse Effects in the Clinic: The 5 Ms.”.  The Katz (2014) team purports that,“Before initiating therapy, however, it is critical that physicians and patients discuss 4 key topics: (1) the benefit of ASCVD risk reduction, (2) medication adverse effects, (3) drug-drug interactions, and (4) patient preferences.”  That sounds all well and good, isn’t profound, and frankly probably is how all drugs are (or ought to be prescribed).

They continue, “To facilitate discussion of statin adverse effects, we present here an evidence-based review of the 5 Ms of statin adverse effects: metabolism, muscle, medication interactions, major organ effects, and memory.”  (Because everyone likes a little alliteration.)

Atop their list of adverse statin considerations stood, “Metabolism.”  The team writes, “‘Metabolism’ represents the small risk of new-onset diabetes that comes with statins”.  Again, it is quite clear that diabetes has been well-established as a statin side effect.

Among other concerns, Katz et al. (2014) cites the following: “‘Major organ effects’ prompt the physician to review the possibility of a transient transaminitis as well as the recent observation of rare acute kidney injury with statin use. Both are rare and do not require routine monitoring. Finally, ‘memory’ references the recent observational data suggesting statins may contribute to memory loss and confusion, both of which have not been observed in RCTs and resolve with drug cessation.”

And lastly, a piece by T.F. Whayne, Jr. et al. titled “Problems and Possible Solutions for Therapy with Statins.” appearing in the June, 2013 The International Journal of Angiology.  This team of researchers from The University of Kentucky (Lexington) cites many problems with statin drugs of which clinicians ought be aware:  “Liver inflammation can occur with statins but is of minimal concern; frequently, statins alleviate the problem. Unless liver transaminases are over three times normal, a statin should be prescribed, if indicated.”

They cite, “Symptoms of statin-related myopathy are of more concern than stated by pharmaceutical companies. Occurrence of myopathy symptoms, estimated to be up to 10.4%, can decrease statin adherence of high CV risk patients.”

And of course, Whayne Jr. et al. (2013) note: “With diabetes mellitus (DM), statins can increase incidence”.  References to cognitive impairment with statin therapy are made as well

Due to the fact that many people have used statin drugs unaware of these and other risks, a number of Lipitor diabetes lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Lipitor and received a diabetes diagnosis, please do not hesitate to contact our team of Lipitor diabetes lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

In recent years, a number of scientific studies have been published linking the use of statin drugs to new onset diabetes.  Examples of these drugs include Lipitor, Crestor, Zocor, and others; and though the cardiovascular benefits of these drugs are not to be discounted, patients ought to be aware of all possible risks.  Here are a few studies noting the statin-diabetes link that I found today.

First, I came across an article titled “Are statins really wonder drugs?” by H.S. Grover et al. published in the November, 2013 edition of Journal of the Formosan Medical Association.  This Indian research team writes “evidence from various studies indicates existence of many statin-induced side effects such as myopathies, rhabdomyolysis, hepatotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, impaired myocardial contractility, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, and erectile dysfunction (ED).”  Unfortunately, the team states “Physician awareness of these side effects is reported to be very low even for the adverse effects (AEs) most widely reported by patients. This can lead to incorrect treatment decisions, compromised patient care, and an increase in patient morbidity.” (emphasis added)

A 2014 article appearing in the May edition of The Consultant Pharmacist published by Z.H. Park, titled “Statin-associated incident diabetes: a literature review.” gathered data by searching through previously-published studies (2000-2013) on the subject.  This team found “Since the report of incident diabetes associated with rosuvastatin, an unexpected finding in the Justification for the Use of Statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin, safety concerns with statins have emerged. Results of observational studies and meta-analyses show association of incident diabetes with statin use in patients with concomitant risk factors for diabetes.”  As such, it’s concluded “Review of current, available clinical data suggest a possible association between statin use and incident diabetes in patients with underlying diabetes risk factors.”

And, an article I found today titled “An assessment by the Statin Diabetes Safety Task Force: 2014 update.” appearing in Journal of Clinical Lipidology by K.C. Maki et al. references recent FDA warning label update requirements for statin drugs:

“Statin therapy reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death by 25% to 30% in primary as well as secondary prevention patients. Thus, statins are the pharmacologic therapy of choice for the management of high blood cholesterol levels. Prompted by examination of clinical trial data suggesting a modest, but statistically significant, increase in the incidence of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus with statin use, the US Food and Drug Administration in 2012 added a statement to the labels of statin medications indicating that increases in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and fasting glucose levels have been reported with statin use.”

Due to the fact that many people have used Lipitor and other statin drugs unaware of the risk for new onset diabetes, a number of Lipitor diabetes lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Lipitor and received a diabetes diagnosis, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the compassion, experience, and resources required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

Recently, an article published in The American Journal of Cardiology titled “Risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus versus reduction in cardiovascular events with statin therapy.” provided important insight into the connection between statin drugs (Lipitor, Crestor, others) and new-onset diabetes.

KL Wang et al. (2014) write “The Food and Drug Administration recently updated the safety warning concerning the association between statin therapy and new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM)” and “For prediabetes, little information is available for statins on cardiovascular outcome reduction and diabetogenic consequences.”  As such, “This study aimed to examine the risk of NODM and the reduction of cardiovascular events and death (MACE) after statin therapy in the prediabetic subjects.”

To establish a study cohort, this team used anonymous records from the Taiwan National Health Insurance agency and “A propensity score-matched model was constructed for statin users and nonusers.”  Overall, “Statin therapy was associated with a greater risk of NODM (hazard ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.32) and less risk of MACE (hazard ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.80), both in dose-dependent fashions.”

In non-scientific terms, this means that the rate of diabetes was increased by 20% among statin users, while the risk for cardiovascular events and death was lowered.  The latter part makes intuitive sense, for this is the overall aim of the drug.  While it is good that the drug performs its intended purpose, it is important that all users be aware of risks associated with any drug.  Unfortunately, the manufacturers of Lipitor, a very prominent statin drug, have failed to include adequate diabetes warnings on Lipitor packaging.

As a result, a number of Lipitor lawsuits have been filed.  If you or loved one used Lipitor and suffered diabetes as a result, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

An article appearing in the July, 2011 issue of Current Opinion in Cardiology titled “Are statins diabetogenic?” by U.K. Sampson et al. gives us a bit more information on the connection between drugs like Lipitor and new-onset diabetes.

The team writes “Statins are widely utilized for low-density lipoprotein lowering and for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although these drugs have a good safety record, increased risk of developing diabetes during extended use has recently garnered attention.”

A short article, this study evaluated the findings of the JUPITER study, a study that aimed to clarify the relationship between statins and diabetes, and “The JUPITER findings are supported by two recent meta-analyses of large-scale placebo-controlled and standard care-controlled trials, which, respectively, observed a 9% [odds ratio 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.17] and 13% (risk ratio 1.13; 95% CI 1.03-1.23) increased risk for incident diabetes associated with statin therapy.”

(Statin drugs increase risk for diabetes 9-13%.)

The team continues “ the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unclear,” and concludes “The aggregate of large clinical trials supports the notion that statins modestly increase the risk of incident diabetes. Because diabetes is a risk equivalent condition for coronary and peripheral arterial diseases, these findings create a paradox whereby needed statin therapy may be withheld to avoid excess risk of diabetes while representing the strongest cardiovascular risk reduction tool in diabetics. We simply recommend regular glucose monitoring in patients taking statins.”

Due to the fact that Lipitor manufacturers and the manufacturers of other statin drugs have failed time and again to warn users of the risk for diabetes, a number of Lipitor lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Lipitor and suffered diabetes, you too may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

Published in the January, 2014 edition of the medical journal Liver Transplantation by Y. Cho et al., an article titled “Statin therapy is associated with the development of new-onset diabetes after transplantation in liver recipients with high fasting plasma glucose levels.”  provides further insight into the connection between statin therapy and new-onset diabetes.  For clarity, statin drugs are a class of cholesterol-lowering medications, and including Lipitor, Crestor, and others, are among the world’s most widely-prescribed.

Cho writes “it has recently been reported that statin therapy is associated with new-onset diabetes in the nontransplant population”, and thus “The aim of this study was to investigate the association between statin therapy and the development of NODAT in LT recipients.”

Studying 364 liver transplant patients without diabetic history, some of whom used statin drugs, the team found that the rate of diabetes after transplant was nearly double in the statin group: about 32% of statin users developed diabetes, while only 17.6% of non-statin patients developed diabetes.  The team also found that after adjusting for other risk factors, “Statin use was significantly associated with [new-onset diabetes after transplant]”, and importantly, confirms “There were no significant differences in age, body mass index, cumulative corticosteroid dose, or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels between the groups.”

Due to the fact that the manufacturers of statin drugs, particularly Lipitor, have failed time and again to warn users of the risk for diabetes associated with statin therapy, a number of Lipitor diabetes lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Lipitor and suffered diabetes as a result, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

In 2014, an article published by Kwok Leung Ong et al. titled “Cardiovascular drugs that increase the risk of new-onset diabetes” in Curriculum in Cardiology aimed to further elucidate the connection between statin drugs and new-onset diabetes.  Statin drugs are a popular type of cholesterol-lowering medications including Lipitor, Crestor, Zocor, and many others.  Other classes of cholesterol-lowering medications include “niacin, thiazide diuretics, and ß-blockers,” all of which, including statins, have been found to increase the risk for developing diabetes by “9% to 43%”.

The team writes “The mechanisms whereby these drugs increase the risk of NOD are incompletely understood, although different hypotheses have been suggested. Lifestyle intervention consisting of diet and exercise has been shown in multiple studies to reduce the risk of NOD by approximately 50%, with persistent benefit during long-term follow-up. In patients at high risk for NOD, niacin should be avoided, and for hypertension, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or even a ß1-selective blocker might be a better choice than a standard ß-blocker. For thiazide diuretics and particularly statins, benefit in terms of CV event reduction outweighs the risk of NOD.”

Unfortunately, the manufacturers of statin drugs (and others) have failed time and again to warn users of the increased risk for diabetes, regardless of the risk-benefit calculus pertaining to cardiovascular benefit associated with statin use.  As a result, a number of Lipitor diabetes lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Lipitor or another cholesterol drug and suffered diabetes as a result, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation for your injury.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

Published in a 2011 edition of Atherosclerosis, a study titled “Differential metabolic effects of distinct statins.” by K.K. Koh et al. aimed to determine how statin drugs affect the body.  Statins are a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs including Lipitor, Crestor, Zocor, and others.

These researchers write “Reciprocal relationships between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance suggest that therapies improving endothelial dysfunction will simultaneously improve insulin sensitivity and other metabolic parameters. However, previous studies with some statins either did not alter insulin sensitivity or promoted insulin resistance despite significant improvements in endothelial dysfunction and decreases in circulating pro-inflammatory markers,” essentially implying that the scientific community had not clarified whether or not Lipitor and other statins raised the risk for diabetes.  Now, a number of studies link statin use to increased risk for diabetes, particularly in women.

This article continues, stating that “Clinical studies including large scale randomized controlled trials demonstrate potential differences between individual statins, with pravastatin promoting risk reduction for new onset of diabetes. Conversely, other statins including atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin all promote significant increase in this risk.”  This means that Pravachol has been found to decrease the risk for diabetes, while Lipitor, Crestor, and Zocor have been found to increase the risk for diabetes.

While the mechanism by which these drugs increase diabetes risk is as yet unclear, the risk is no less clear, and manufacturers of these drugs ought to warn users.  Because manufacturers have failed to do so, a number of statin-diabetes lawsuits have been filed, particularly Lipitor-diabetes lawsuits.  If you or a loved one used Lipitor or another statin and suffered diabetes, you too may be entitled to significant financial compensation.

For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

Published March, 2014 in BMC Medicine, a report by AF Macedo et al. titled “Unintended effects of statins from observational studies in the general population: systematic review and meta-analysis.” aimed to “assess unintended effects of statins from observational studies in general populations with comparison of the findings where possible with those derived from randomized trials.”

Statins are class of medications prescribed to treat high cholesterol and have a reliable track record for reducing the risk of adverse cardiovascular events.  Unfortunately, the drugs (such as Lipitor, Zocor, Crestor, and others) have been linked to a 10-30% increased risk for new onset diabetes, another disease affecting millions around the world.

Evaluating 90 different studies of statin side effects, this team determined that “There was evidence of an increased risk of myopathy, raised liver enzymes and diabetes (respectively: OR 2.63 (95% CI 1.50 to 4.61); OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.47 to 1.62); OR 1.31 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.73)).”  In non-scientific terms, this means that statin use raised the risk for myopathy by 163%, raised liver enzymes 54%, and diabetes by 31%.

Sadly, the manufacturer of Lipitor and other statin drugs has failed time and again to warn users of the risks associated with their medication.  As a result, a number of Lipitor lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Lipitor and suffered diabetes as a result, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

In February, 2014, an article titled “Statin treatment and new-onset diabetes: A review of proposed mechanisms.” appearing in the medical journal Metabolism discusses the role of statin use in new onset diabetes.  Statin drugs are cholesterol-lowering medications including Lipitor, and are among the most widely-prescribed drugs in the world.

This research team, led by M. Brault states that “New-onset diabetes has been observed in clinical trials and meta-analyses involving statin therapy.”  In an attempt to elucidate the biochemical mechanism by which statin use contributes to diabetes onset, the team suggests that “First, certain statins affect insulin secretion through direct, indirect or combined effects on calcium channels in pancreatic β-cells. Second, reduced translocation of glucose transporter 4 in response to treatment results in hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Third, statin therapy decreases other important downstream products, such as coenzyme Q10, farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, and dolichol; their depletion leads to reduced intracellular signaling. Other possible mechanisms implicated in the effect of statins on new-onset diabetes are: statin interference with intracellular insulin signal transduction pathways via inhibition of necessary phosphorylation events and reduction of small GTPase action; inhibition of adipocyte differentiation leading to decreased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein which are important pathways for glucose homeostasis; decreased leptin causing inhibition of β-cells proliferation and insulin secretion; and diminished adiponectin levels.”

Of course, Brault et al. (2014) are cautious to write-off statin use with the increased risk for diabetes posed considering the dramatic benefit these drugs have in relation to heart disease and cholesterol level adjustment and maintenance.  Sadly, however, a number of people have used Lipitor and other similar drugs unaware of the risk for diabetes due to a failure to warn on the part of the manufacturer.  Every patient deserves to know all possible risks and benefits associated with any drug ingested.

As a result of this failure to warn, a number of Lipitor diabetes lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Lipitor and suffered diabetes as a result, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.

An article published in the March, 2014 edition of The American Journal of Cardiology titled “Effect of Change in Body Weight on Incident Diabetes Mellitus in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease Treated With Atorvastatin (from the Treating to New Targets Study).” by KL Ong et al. aimed to further clarify the link between Lipitor use and new onset diabetes.

While Lipitor and other drugs in the statin class are highly effective in reducing the risk for adverse cardiac events, a great deal of research has come out linking Lipitor and diabetes, a risk of which patients should at the very least be aware.

This research team “investigated whether change in body weight may predict NODM in statin-treated patients” and “7,595 patients without prevalent diabetes mellitus at baseline from the Treating to New Targets (TNT) study were included in this analysis.”  After a great deal of statistical analysis, the team concluded that “1-year change in body weight is predictive of NODM in patients who underwent statin therapy from the TNT trial” and stated that “Our study highlights the importance of weight control as a lifestyle measure to prevent statin-related NODM.”

Due to the fact that a number of patients have used Lipitor unaware of the increased risk for diabetes as a result of the manufacturer’s failure to warn, a number of Lipitor lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Lipitor and received a diabetes diagnosis, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Lipitor diabetes lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our Lipitor Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about Lipitor.