Titled “Further findings linking SSRIs during pregnancy and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: clinical implications.”, this article appearing in the October, 2012 edition of CNS Drugs by M. Galbally et al., identifies persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) as a potential consequence of SSRI exposure before birth.

Galbally et al. (2012) writes “Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a rare but potentially life-threatening neonatal condition. Several authors have suggested that late pregnancy exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may increase the risk of PPHN. This association has been investigated in seven published studies that have shown mixed findings based on diverse methods. Several methodological limitations may account for the diversity of findings, which include, in some studies, a lack of control for well established risk factors for PPHN. The methodological improvement in the most recent study tentatively suggests that infants prenatally exposed to SSRIs are approximately twice as likely to suffer PPHN. Further research on the biological mechanisms involved is required. Clinicians should consider late pregnancy exposure to SSRIs as one of several possible risks for PPHN, which has implications for both prescribing SSRIs to pregnant women and for neonatal care of SSRI-exposed infants.”

Since the manufacturers of SSRIs like Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Celexa, and others have failed time and again to adequately inform women of the risk for birth defects, SSRI birth defect lawsuits are currently being filed by the thousands.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a birth defect or who faced adverse birth outcomes, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the compassion, experience, and resources required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

In 2009, S. Alwan and J.M. Friedman, a research duo from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, published a study titled “Safety of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy.” in CNS Drugs that provided important insight into the link between gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (such as Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft) and serious congenital malformations.

Because it’s written in plain English and not-so-scientific terms, I have included the abstract below:

“Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are among the most commonly used medications, with a prescription frequency of 2.3% in pregnant women. Although most babies born to women who take SSRIs during pregnancy are normal, there is accumulating evidence that maternal SSRI treatment during pregnancy may cause adverse reproductive outcomes.

[ ]

Maternal SSRI treatment during the first trimester has been implicated in increased risks of birth defects, specifically cardiac abnormalities, in the infant, whereas third-trimester treatment has been linked to various neonatal complications, including symptoms of neonatal withdrawal and toxicity, prematurity, low birth weight and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Although data on neurobehavioural and long-term cognitive problems among children of women who were treated with SSRIs during pregnancy remain limited, the possibility of such functional abnormalities is an additional concern.

[ ]

On the other hand, untreated maternal depression also carries serious risks for both the mother and the baby, and SSRIs are one of the best available treatments. Thus, pregnant women who require treatment for depression and their physicians often face a difficult choice regarding the use of SSRIs.”

While untreated maternal depression does in fact constitute a serious problem, it is of utmost concern that expecting mothers make informed decisions regarding drug use during pregnancy.  And because the manufacturers of many SSRI drugs have failed time and again to adequately inform women of these risks, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Here, I present two studies I read this morning concerning the connection between prenatal SSRI exposure and adverse perinatal outcomes.  selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs) are widely used for a range of psychiatric ailments from depression to anxiety and work by regulating the concentration of serotonin molecules in the synapses between neurons.  Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that plays a large role in mood, appetite, and sleep regulation, and also in fetal development, particularly in the development of the heart.  This is why many scientific studies have linked early pregnancy SSRI exposure to cardiac malformations.

First to be discussed, the findings of an Australian research team concerning neonatal seizures for babies exposed to SSRIs in pregnancy.  In their study titled, “Neonatal seizures from in utero venlafaxine exposure.” and published in Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health (November 2006), RK Pakalapati et al. write “We present a report of two infants with neonatal seizures attributed to maternal use of venlafaxine.”  To be clear, venlafaxine is the chemical name for the popular antidepressant, Effexor.

The team continues, “The first infant was hypotonic and required resuscitation at birth. The second was born in a good condition but developed clinically apparent seizures after the second day of life.”

Stating that “Other causes of neonatal seizures were excluded and neurological investigations on these two infants were unremarkable”, Pakalapati et al. (2006) suggested that “all infants exposed to maternal venlafaxine, no matter their condition at birth, be monitored in hospital for at least 3 to 4 days in order to preempt and treat adverse neurological events.”

Next, a study that demonstrates the presence of SSRIs in amniotic fluid.  It has long been known that SSRIs may cross the placenta, but here we see SSRIs may access fetus, if you will, by other means.  In this article titled “Antidepressants in amniotic fluid: another route of fetal exposure.” by AM Loughhead et al., appearing in American Journal of Psychiatry, this team of researchers from Emory University School of Medicine studied amniotic fluid from 27 women, finding that “the amniotic fluid’s antidepressant concentrations were highly variable. For the parent compounds, the amniotic fluid concentrations of selective serotonin uptake inhibitors averaged 11.6% (SD=9.9%) of maternal serum concentrations (N=22). Amniotic fluid to maternal serum ratios were higher for venlafaxine: 172% (SD=91%) (N=3).”

As such, the team writes, “The pattern of antidepressant concentrations in amniotic fluid is similar to recent data for placental passage. Although the significance of amniotic fluid exposure remains to be determined, these results demonstrate that maternally administered antidepressants are accessible to the fetus in a manner not previously appreciated.”

Because many women have used Effexor unaware of the risk for adverse birth outcomes, a number of Effexor® birth defects lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Effexor and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Effexor® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Over the past two decades, a number of scientific studies have demonstrated that exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs) can have adverse effects on a developing fetus.  Here, I’ll reference a pair of European studies that cite these adverse effects.

First, an article titled “[Withdrawal symptoms in a neonate following exposure to venlafaxine during pregnancy].” published in July, 2003 in a Dutch medical journal by R.A. de Moor et al.  These researchers presented a case study, wherein, “Withdrawal symptoms occurred in a male neonate after maternal use of venlafaxine for depression during pregnancy.”  For clarity, venlafaxine is the chemical name for Effexor, a popular antidepressant.

The team found that symptoms included “restlessness, hypertonia, jitteriness, irritability and poor feeding. The diagnosis was confirmed by a temporary improvement after administration of a low dose (1 mg) of venlafaxine to the boy. Eventually the symptoms began to decline spontaneously, and ceased after 8 days.”

As such, it was concluded that, “Exposure to venlafaxine and other antidepressants which inhibit serotonin reuptake during the third trimester of pregnancy carries the risk of a neonatal withdrawal syndrome.”

Next, a study from a team of Swiss researchers led by M. Treichel titled, “Is there a correlation between venlafaxine therapy during pregnancy and a higher incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis?” appearing in the February, 2009 edition of World Journal of Pediatrics studied a correlation between necrotizing enterocolitis  and prenatal exposure to SSRI drugs.  Necrotizing enterocolitis is “the death of intestinal tissue. It most often affects premature or sick babies.”

These researchers write, “Novel antidepressant drugs are increasingly used by women of child bearing age” at the outset of their presentation of a harmed child and literature review: “We present preterm twins whose mother was treated with venlafaxine, a nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, throughout pregnancy until delivery. The twins developed neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.”

Due to the fact that a number of women have used SSRI drugs unaware of the risk for adverse birth outcomes and congenital malformation, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits and Effexor® birth defects lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Effexor and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Effexor® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

A study titled “Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine during pregnancy in term and preterm neonates.” published in the January, 2007 edition of Pediatrics by E. Ferreira et al. made great strides in elucidating the connection between preterm birth and gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or Effexor (venlafaxine).

The team states, “Our goals were to (a) describe neonatal behavioral signs in a group of newborns exposed in utero to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or venlafaxine at the time of delivery, (b) compare the rate of neonatal behavioral signs, prematurity, and admission to specialized neonatal care between a group of exposed and unexposed newborns, and (c) compare the effects in exposed preterm and term newborns.”

[Click here to read other articles linking SSRI exposure and adverse birth outcomes, ranging from low birth weight to major congenital malformations.]

“Seventy-six mothers taking antidepressants and 90 untreated mothers and their newborns were analyzed” and results showed that “In infants in the exposed group, signs involving the central nervous and the respiratory systems were often observed (63.2% and 40.8%, respectively).”  “All exposed premature newborns presented behavioral manifestations compared with 69.1% of term exposed newborns. Median length of stay was almost 4 times longer for exposed premature newborns than for those who were unexposed (14.5 vs 3.7 days).”

As such, the team concluded that “Neonatal behavioral signs were frequently found in exposed newborns” and “Premature infants could be more susceptible to the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine.”

Since many women have used SSRIs and Effexor unaware of the risk for birth complications, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Effexor and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Effexor® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

An article published in the October, 2010 edition of Canadian Journal of Psychiatry by a team of researchers from Pfizer (Canada), led by É. Ramos, titled “Association between antidepressant use during pregnancy and infants born small for gestational age.” that sheds light on the connection between gestational exposure to SSRI drugs and low birth weight.  SSRI drugs are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and this team refers to low birth weight as “small for gestational age,” or SGA.

The team writes “A case-control study was performed using data from the Quebec Pregnancy Registry, which includes 152,107 pregnant women between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2002. For this study, eligible women were aged 15 to 45 years on the first day of gestation, had drug plan coverage from the Régie de l’Assurance Maladie du Québec for 12 months or more prior to and during pregnancy, had at least 1 psychiatric disorder diagnosis before pregnancy, used ADs for at least 30 days in the year prior to pregnancy, and delivered a live singleton.”  To be clear, “AD” means antidepressant drugs.

Results showed that “Among the 938 eligible pregnancies, 128 (13.6%) infants were born SGA. Other ADs, mainly venlafaxine, used by women during the second trimester were associated with an increased risk of infants born SGA, compared with nonusers of ADs (adjusted relative risk = 2.41; 95% CI 1.07 to 5.43).”

This means that women who used venlafaxine (Effexor) during pregnancy were 2.41 times as likely to have a child with low birth weight as women who had not used SSRIs during pregnancy.

Since so many women have used Effexor during pregnancy unaware of these and other risks, a number of Effexor® birth defects lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Effexor and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Effexor® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Published in May, 2009 in Pharmacopsychiatry by a team of Australian researchers led by J. Rampono, an article titled “Placental transfer of SSRI and SNRI antidepressants and effects on the neonate.” provides further evidence that drugs such as Celexa, Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Effexor and others may cross the placenta and affect a developing fetus.

The team writes “We investigated placental transfer and neurobehavioural effects in neonates exposed to citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine or sertraline (SSRI’s), or to venlafaxine (an SNRI)” and states that “Women receiving antidepressants during pregnancy and their neonates were studied. Cord and maternal drug concentrations were measured at birth and in the neonates plasma on day 3. Neonates were also assessed using a range of neurobehavioral tests and compared to controls.”

Results showed that “Neonatal abstinence scores were significantly higher (p<0.05) in exposed infants than controls on day 1. Brazelton scores for habituation, social-interactive, motor and autonomic clusters, and serotonin scores were significantly greater (p<0.05) in exposed infants.”  Accordingly, Rampono et al. (2009) concluded that “Transfer of SSRIs and SNRIs across the placenta was substantial.”

Because so many expecting mothers have used these drugs unaware of the risk for perinatal complications, adverse birth outcomes, or congenital malformations, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

A 2013 article by J.N. Lind et al. published in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety titled “Maternal medication and herbal use and risk for hypospadias: data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997-2007.” made links between Effexor and birth defects, and between Clomid and birth defects.

Using “data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multi-site, population-based, case-control study,” the team studied over 1,500 newborns with hypospadias and compared them with information about 4,300 infants without the birth defect.  For clarity, hypospadias is a birth defect wherein the urethra of a male infant is on the underside of the penis.

Studying 64 different drugs mothers had used, and 24 additional herbal components, the team found that this birth defect was associated with the antidepressant Effexor and the fertility drug Clomid.  Children born to mothers who used Effexor were 2.4 times as likely to suffer hypospadias, and children born to mothers who used Clomid were 1.9 times as likely to suffer the birth defect.

Due to the fact that many women use SSRI drugs during pregnancy unaware of the risk for birth defects, a number of Effexor® birth defects lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Effexor and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Effexor® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

In 2010, an article published in Canadian Medical Association Journal titled “Use of antidepressants during pregnancy and the risk of spontaneous abortion.” illustrated the link between SSRI use during pregnancy and increased risk for spontaneous abortion.

This study, led by H.R. Nakhai-Pour of The University of Montreal, “obtained data from the Quebec Pregnancy Registry for 5124 women who had a clinically detected spontaneous abortion.”  And “For each case, [they] randomly selected 10 controls from the remaining women in the registry who were matched by the case’s index date (date of spontaneous abortion) and gestational age at the time of spontaneous abortion. Use of antidepressants was defined by filled prescriptions and was compared with nonuse.”

Results showed that 5.5% of women who suffered spontaneous abortion were prescribe antidepressants at the time, compared to only 2.7% of matched controls.  After statistical analysis, it was determined that use of antidepressants, specifically SSRIs (such as Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, and others) raised the risk for spontaneous abortion 61% over non-use.  Paxil itself raised risk for spontaneous abortion 75%, Effexor raised the risk for spontaneous abortion 211%.

Since many women have used SSRIs during pregnancy unaware of these risks, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used SSRIs during pregnancy and suffered spontaneous abortion, gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

A recent article by P. Broy et al. published in Current Drug Delivery titled “Gestational exposure to antidepressants and the risk of spontaneous abortion: a review.” provides important insight into the connection between in vitro exposure to SSRI drugs and spontaneous abortion.  SSRI drugs are a relatively new class of antidepressant medications, which aim to regulate (increase) serotonin levels in the brain.  Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter involved in mood, sleep, appetite, and fetal development.

The team writes “Although the relationship between antidepressant use during pregnancy and its adverse effects has been widely investigated, very few studies have evaluated the impact of antidepressant use during pregnancy on the risk of spontaneous abortion” and states “We present an overview of the evidence relating to the association between antidepressant use during gestation and the risk of spontaneous abortion.”

Reviewing fifteen previously-conducted studies, these researchers found that “paroxetine (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.3 – 2.3) and venlafaxine (OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.3 – 3.3) were significantly associated with the risk of spontaneous abortion.”

In non-scientific terms, this means that Paxil (paroxetine) increases the risk for spontaneous abortion by 70% over placebo, and that Effexor (venlafaxine) was shown to increase the risk for spontaneous abortion by 210%, just more than double.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs during pregnancy and suffered spontaneous abortion or gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation through a Paxil® birth defects lawsuit or an Effexor® birth defects lawsuit.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI Birth Defects Lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.