Quinilones are synthetic antibacterial drugs used for the treatment of urinary tract infections.  Quinilones are effective in the fight against bacteria because they prevent bacterial DNA from unwinding and multiplying.  This unwinding and duplicating process is how bacteria spread and infect different parts of the body.  Quinolones in the clinical setting belong to the subset fluoroquinolones.  Health care providers have recently raised awareness on infrequent toxicities associated with some of these types of drugs and drug classes.  The safety of quinilones is in question and some people in the medical world are not convinced the benefits outweigh the risks these drugs may pose.  There are certain steps that can be taken to protect a patient that include continued surveillance of safety and collecting tolerability data.

Medical researcher RC Owens Jr. from the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Pharmacy Services, at the Maine Medical Center, in Portland, Maine, worked on a review titled “Antimicrobial Safety:  Focus on Fluoroquinolones”, where one major aim was to assess the safety and tolerability of quinolones in human subjects.  The review found that negative event’s associated with the quinolone class was headaches, dizziness, nausea, and diarrhea.  These adverse events have to do with the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system.  Effects on the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system were mild and usually did not require the use of the medication to end.  While most side effects were not serious, complications with the cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system, endocrine system, renal system, and central nervous system included tendinitis, tendon rupture, glucose homeostasis dysregulation, acute renal failure, and seizures.  The above complications (while uncommon) are serious and may cause the discontinuation of the therapy.

Author RC Owens Jr. states “Severe idiosyncratic adverse events are specific to individual agents that may share some structural congruity, such as the 1-(2,4)-difluorophenyl group shared by trovafloxacin (associated with hepatitis), temafloxacin (associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome), and tosufloxacin (associated with eosinophilic pneumonitis)”.  This means that negative behavioral characteristics are specific to individual agents that are structurally similar and that shape determines their functions and qualities.  Rates of discontinuation for the currently marketed quinolones were seen at 4 percent from clinical trials.  Trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin are no longer available for general use due to their higher discontinuation rates (7% and 6.4 %).

In conclusion, this report found that the safety of marketed quinolones is similar to other antimicrobial classes.  Adverse effects are unusual but central nervous system effects are more common with the quinolone class.  Some susceptible populations may be more prone to rare adverse effects due to certain genetic factors, but this can be prevented by avoiding the specific quinolone.  It is not 100 percent clear if the therapeutic value outweighs the potential risks associated with the quinolone class.

Due to the fact that a number of people have used the drug Cipro (an oral quinolone) unaware of the risks associated with the drug, a number of Cipro lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Cipro and experienced negative Cipro side-effects, do not hesitate to contact our team of Cipro lawyers at Dangerous Drugs for you may be entitled to significant financial compensation for the undue injury you have endured.

For more information, or for a free, no-obligation Cipro lawsuit consultation, reach our offices at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Cipro (ciprofloxacin), an antibiotic that has recently been linked to retinal detachment and other nerve disorders, came under fire last week as the US Food and Drug Administration rules that new warnings and usage guidelines be included on its packaging “to better describe the serious side effect of peripheral neuropathy”[1] or, nerve damage.

MedlinePlus, an online medical encyclopedia curated by the National Institutes of Health and the US National Library of Medicine explains peripheral neuropathy in this way:

“Peripheral nerves carry information to and from the brain. They also carry signals to and from the spinal cord to the rest of the body.

Peripheral neuropathy means these nerves don’t work properly. Peripheral neuropathy may be damage to a single nerve. It may be damage to a nerve group. It may also affect nerves in the whole body.”[2]

This warning label update applies to all oral fluoroquinolones, including “levofloxacin (Levaquin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), and gemifloxacin (Factive),”[3] and the FDA warns that “This serious nerve damage potentially caused by fluoroquinolones may occur soon after these drugs are taken and may be permanent.”[4] (emphasis added)

Many peer reviewed studies have previously shown associations between Cipro and rare, but serious side-effects affecting the central nervous system; it is about time that the labels were properly updated.

However, due to allegations that the manufacturer of Cipro (Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) knew the risks associated with its product but failed to act, a number of Cipro retinal detachment lawsuits and Cipro nerve damage lawsuits are currently being filed.

If you or a loved one used Cipro and experienced retinal detachment or another Cipro side-effect, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For more information, or for a free, no-obligation Cipro lawsuit consultation, please do not hesitate to contact our team of Cipro lawyers at the information provided below.

We have the experience, resources, and skills required to bring you the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help!

(855) 452-5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

In an article published last year in The Journal of The American Medical Academy, by Mahyar Etminan et al. set out to “examine the association between use of oral fluoroquinolones and the risk of developing a retinal detachment.”  Oral fluoroquinolones (Cipro, others) are antibiotics used in a wide range of medical procedures, and have recently been associated with an increased risk for retinal detachment.  The authors of the study comment: “Despite numerous case reports of ocular toxicity, a pharmacoepidemiological study of their ocular safety, particularly retinal detachment, has not been performed.”

To gather data, Etminan et al. (2012) examined “a cohort of patients in British Columbia, Canada, who had visited an ophthalmologist between January 2000 and December 2007” and defined “retinal detachment cases” were defined as patients who had “retinal repair surgery within 14 days of a physician service.”

Here is what their research showed:

“Current use of fluoroquinolones was associated with a higher risk of developing a retinal detachment (3.3% of cases vs 0.6% of controls; adjusted rate ratio [ARR], 4.50 [95% CI, 3.56-5.70]).”

What this means is that Cipro use makes one 4.5 times as likely to experience retinal detachment than if one used another class of antibiotic drugs.  (“ARR” stands for “Adjusted Risk Rate.)

Another way the Etminan et al. (2012) data can be understood is as such: The general population experiences retinal detachment at a rate of 0.6%, while people who use Cipro experience retinal detachment at a rate of 3.3%.

Due to the fact that the manufacturer of Cipro failed to make physicians and patients aware of the association between Cipro and retinal detachment, a number of Cipro lawsuits are currently being filed.

If you or a loved one used Cipro and experienced retinal detachment, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation for injuries caused by no fault of your own.  For more information, or for a free, no-obligation case consultation, please do not hesitate to contact our team of Cipro lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.

(855) 452-5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Call today and see how we can help!

Published earlier this year in The Journal of the American Medical Association, a piece by Dr. Dennis P. Han et al. concludes that “patients taking oral fluoroquinolones were at a higher risk of developing a retinal detachment compared with nonusers, although the absolute risk for this condition was small.”  Oral fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), are a class of antibiotic drugs commonly-used during surgery.

Retinal detachment is a disease characterized by MedlinePlus, a prominent online medical encyclopedia curated by the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, as “a separation of the light-sensitive membrane in the back of the eye (the retina) from its supporting layers.”

Here is a link to the MedlinePlus “Retinal Detachment” page.

And, according to Han et al. (2013), is an ailment with an overall frequency in the general population of about 0.6%.

Reviewing the medical records of nearly one million consenting American patients, Han and his team determined that while a patient is using fluoroquinolones, however, the risk for retinal detachment jumps to 3.3%.  That is, use of Cipro makes one 4.5 times as likely to experience retinal detachment.

Interestingly, risk for retinal detachment was not elevated by recent use nor past use.  Only current use of the drug was associated with an increased risk for retinal detachment.

Due to the fact that many users of Cipro and other oral fluoroquinolones were not made aware of the increased risk for retinal detachment before using the drug, a number of Cipro lawsuits are currently being filed.

If you or a loved one used Cipro and suffered retinal detachment, please do not hesitate to contact our team of Cirpo Retinal Detachment Lawyers for a free, no-obligation case consultation.

At your convenience, you may reach our offices by phone at (855) 452-5529 or by e-mail at justinian@dangerousdrugs.us.  Call today and see how we can help!