Stryker Hip Replacement

The use of metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings in both hip resurfacing and in total hip replacement has brought along the risk of overexposure to cobalt and chromium ions, a direct result of MOM bearings commonly causing a rise in metal ion levels for both cobalt and chromium.  This can lead to a range of symptoms ranging from neurological ailments to cardiac problems.

A recent study by J. Daniel, et. al. aimed at discovering any significant difference in the possibility of a rise in blood metal ion levels in respect to the bearing diameters in both MOM total hip replacement and in MOM hip resurfacing.  Results indicated that there was no significant difference in the blood concentrations or daily output of cobalt and chromium in between a larger MOM hip resurfacing bearing and a smaller MOM total hip replacement bearing.  The data suggested that while there is no difference to be found between two bearing size across the two separate procedures, there were significantly higher metal ion levels following MOM hip repair procedures.

If you or a loved one has felt the adverse effects of raised metal ion levels following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty or total hip replacement, then you may be eligible to file a metal-on-metal hip replacement lawsuit.  Contact our team of metal-on-metal hip replacement lawyers and let us help you seek the justice you deserve.

At your convenience, you may reach our offices by phone at (855) 452-5529 or by e-mail at justinian@dangerousdrugs.us.  Call today and see how we can help!

Metal-on-metal bearings in hip resurfacing arthroplasty have been associated with prolonged periods of elevated metal ion circulation in the bloodstream.  Specific ions, such as chromium and cobalt are known to be particularly threatening to the general health of the patient, often times leading to symptoms associated with metal toxicity.  A recent study focused on the untested variables that may affect the metal ion levels of patients who undergo metal-on-metal hip resurfacing procedures.

The study, conducted by Nicholas Desy, et. al. focused primarily on surgical factors that may have an effect on the patients immediate and prolonged metal ion levels following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.  The results indicated that a smaller implant diameter, larger cup inclination, and lower postoperative functional scores are associated with increased metal ion levels for both cobalt and chromium following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing.  This research suggests that increased metal ion levels following metal-on-metal arthroplasty might be the result of not only the hardware used but also the judgment and effectiveness of the surgeon both before and during the procedure.

If you have suffered from any of the symptoms associated with high metal ion levels following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty, then you may be entitled to compensation if it is determined that your experiences was the result of faulty hardware or surgical neglect.  Contact our law offices to receive your free, no-obligation consultation.

(855) 452-5529
justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip replacement has been a commonly used approach to hip repair, and with this surgery the risk of adverse effects is always present.  These effects include osteolysis, or bone-decay, as well as toxicity due to the metals that release ions into the body.  Recently, ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement surgery has been considered an option for procedures that would regularly use the MOM approach.

A current study from A. Grubel, et. al. was conducted to form a comparison between ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement and metal-on-metal total hip replacement.  The study specifically aimed at determining if the metal ion levels for aluminum and cobalt, two ions known for their potential dangerous effects, were higher in on or the other approaches to hip repair.  The research determined that while aluminum metal ion levels seemed to be comparably low for both ceramic and metal hip replacements, there seemed to be a significantly higher cobalt metal ion level in patients with MOM hip replacements. Increased cobalt levels have been reported to be associated with neurological (hand tremor, incoordination, cognitive decline, depression, vertigo, hearing loss and visual changes), cardiac (arrhythmias and cardiomyopathy) and endocrine symptoms.

Despite ceramic-on-ceramic hip replacement being considered as a viable alternative to MOM total hip replacement, patients are still often receiving MOM arthroplasty.  If you or a loved one has experienced the symptoms associated with high cobalt metal ion levels after receiving a metal-on-metal total hip replacement, then you may be eligible to file a metal-on-metal hip replacement lawsuit with our specially trained metal-on-metal hip replacement team.

At your convenience, you may reach our offices by phone at (855) 452-5529 or by e-mail at justinian@dangerousdrugs.us.

Metal-on-metal hip replacement (MOM) was introduced in total hip replacement to avoid complications such as osteolysis, the process where bone marrow is not produced, causing weakness in joints and bone structure to occur, a phenomenon often times found in patients with conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings.  This ailment is oftentimes only symptomatic in giving a small amount of joint pain, which often occurs as a minor effect following effective ship replacement surgery, meaning that symptoms of such a serious condition may not lead patients or physicians to notice osteolysis.  Additionally, researchers have noted that often times osteolysis is asymptomatic.  A recent study by Monika Huber, et. al. investigated the rise in reports of osteolysis and other related complications that arise due to the use of MOM hip implants, using implants retrieved post mortem.

The research confirmed previous studies that determined that there may be frequent, unappreciated femoral bone loss in patients with MOM implants, with osteolysis occurring at comparable levels to that of the conventional metal-on-polyethylene implants.  This research indicates that MOM hip replacement may be as dangerous as dated, conventional methods, posing a threat of femoral bone loss, a serious condition often times unnoticed until far after infliction as occurred.

Our lawyers specialize in filing lawsuits for the victims of the adverse effects of metal-on-metal hip replacement.  Please contact us if you or a loved one has suffered from osteolysis or other related ailments due to the surgical use of metal-on-metal hip implants, for we can help secure the justice you deserve.

For a free, no-obligation case consultation, you may reach our offices by phone at (855) 452-5529 or by e-mail at justinian@dangerousdrugs.us.

Many factors affect the blood metal ion levels of patients after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.  While certain ions have found to cause a range of adverse events, others, such as chromium and cobalt have been found to be carcinogenic.  A current study by AlisterJ. Hart et al. focused on the main surgically-adjustable variable, the amount of coverage of the head of the new leg bone provided by the cup (the new, synthetic hip bone), a function of inclination and version angles.  The authors state that “most studies have used plain radiographs which have questionable precision and accuracy…these studies do not simultaneously assess version and inclination.”  This indicates that further research must be done to understand the relationship between version and blood metal ion levels.

The study showed that there was a correlation between version and inclination to blood metal levels specifically identifying chromium and cobalt, which both are known to be dangerous cancer causing ions.  They concluded that insufficient cup version can be a cause of high blood metal ions after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.

Metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty lawsuits can be filed with our metal-on-metal hip lawyers if you are a victim of the adverse effects of inaccurate version or inclination determination for a metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.  If you have suffered from the effects of high blood metal ion levels due to metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty, please contact us today to give you the justice deserved.

(855) 452-5529
justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

A recent study conducted by Wolf-Christoph Witzleb et al. focused on the implications of the metal ions released through the expected corrosion that occurs after a metal-on-metal hip replacement or hip resurfacing.  Two of these metal ions, cobalt and chromium are known to have carcinogenic and mutagenic effects in patients with metal-on-metal hips, leading to higher risks of cancer and systemic toxicity.

The study investigated the effects of chromium and cobalt emissions from Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty (BHR) and cementless (metal-on-metal) total hip replacement over the first two years after implantation.  The researchers observed that the concentration levels of both cobalt and chromium were significantly higher in those with metal-on-metal total hip replacements and with BHR operations than in the control subjects.  This indicates that the adverse effects of chromium and cobalt on patients who received metal-on-metal hip replacements or BHR hip resurfacing are more likely to occur than for patients who receive other means of hip repair.

A number of metal-on-metal hip replacement lawsuits have been filed because of the use of these risky and unpredictable procedures which may lead to adverse effects as extreme as cancer.  Our lawyers are able to help you or a loved one determine if you could have a claim because of the use of BHR or full metal-on-metal hip replacements in the repair of hip joints.  Contact us today for a free consultation.

(855) 452-5529
justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

A recent study conducted by Wolf-Christoph Witzleb et al. focused on the implications of the metal ions released through the expected corrosion that occurs after a metal-on-metal hip replacement or hip resurfacing.  Two of these metal ions, cobalt and chromium are known to have carcinogenic and mutagenic effects in patients with metal-on-metal hips, leading to higher risks of cancer and systemic toxicity.

The study investigated the effects of chromium and cobalt emissions from Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty (BHR) and cementless (metal-on-metal) total hip replacement over the first two years after implantation.  The researchers observed that the concentration levels of both cobalt and chromium were significantly higher in those with metal-on-metal total hip replacements and with BHR operations than in the control subjects.  This indicates that the adverse effects of chromium and cobalt on patients who received metal-on-metal hip replacements or BHR hip resurfacing are more likely to occur than for patients who receive other means of hip repair.

A number of metal-on-metal hip replacement lawsuits have been filed because of the use of these risky and unpredictable procedures which may lead to adverse effects as extreme as cancer.  Our lawyers are able to help you or a loved one determine if you could have a claim because of the use of BHR or full metal-on-metal hip replacements in the repair of hip joints.  Contact us today for a free consultation.

(855) 452-5529
justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

A recent study in Symposium posed the question of whether metal ions released from arthroplasty reach levels comparable to that of workers in heavy metal industries.  The metal ions are most commonly cleared through urine, meaning that high enough levels can lead to renal damage.  The study, published by Dr. Massimo Corradi et al. (2011), aimed at determining if patients who have had metal-on-metal hips for a 10-year period have the early renal markers which may indicate renal damage.

The study determined that at the 10-year mark, the metal levels were comparable with those who have not received metal-on-metal hips, indicating that renal damage was not yet connected with the metal levels caused by metal-on-metal hips.  The same study also determined that further research was required to determine the longer-term effects of metal-on-metal hips as the determined low-intensity but long-term trace element exposure of this procedure can result in potential nephrotoxicity.

If you have suffered any malfunctioning of the kidneys after a metal-on-metal hip replacement, it may be connected to the trace element exposure following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.  Please contact us if you have experienced any of the effects of renal damage as it may be connected with the use of a potentially dangerous exposure to metal trace elements from arthroplasty involving metal-on-metal joints.

At your convenience, you may reach our team of hip replacement lawyers by phone at (855) 452-5529 or by e-mail at justinian@dangerousdrugs.us.   Call today and see how we can help!

This is from 02/18, but I forgot to post it back then.  Not sure what ramifications, if any, this will have for the various DePuy and Striker hip replacement lawsuits.  I’m certainly interested in speaking to anyone with a problem with their replacement hip regardless of gender.

CHICAGO — Hip replacements are slightly more likely to fail in women than in men, according to one of the largest studies of its kind in U.S. patients. The risk of the implants failing is low, but women were 29% more likely than men to need a repeat surgery within the first three years.

The message for women considering hip replacement surgery remains unclear. It’s not known which models of hip implants perform best in women, even though women make up the majority of the more than 400,000 Americans who have full or partial hip replacements each year to ease the pain and loss of mobility caused by arthritis or injuries.

“This is the first step in what has to be a much longer-term research strategy to figure out why women have worse experiences,” said Diana Zuckerman, president of the nonprofit National Research Center for Women & Families. “Research in this area could save billions of dollars” and prevent patients from experiencing the pain and inconvenience of surgeries to fix hip implants that go wrong.

Source; USA TODAY

Here’s a news item about the various lawsuits being filed over Stryker hips.  My firm is evaluating cases right now for folks who received a Stryker hip.

More than 80 lawsuits have been filed in Bergen County against Stryker Orthopaedics by patients claiming that the Mahwah-based medical device maker sold them a defective hip implant that was later recalled from the market.

Source: Mahwah-based Stryker Orthopaedics faces hip implant lawsuits – NorthJersey.com