A 2011 article by D.H. Williams et al. published in that year’s December edition of Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (US) titled “Prevalence of pseudotumor in asymptomatic patients after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.” sheds further important insight into the tendency for metal-on-metal hip replacements to release dangerous metal ions into the bloodstream.

In a 2012 study appearing in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research titled “Pseudotumors are common in well-positioned low-wearing metal-on-metal hips.”, AK Matthies et al. write “Pseudotumors are sterile inflammatory lesions found in the soft tissues surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) and metal-on-polyethylene hip arthroplasties. In patients with MOM hip arthroplasties, pseudotumors are thought to represent

A 2010 article published in Journal of Orthopaedic Research by YM Kwon et al. titled “Lymphocyte proliferation responses in patients with pseudotumors following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty.” studied “the incidence and level of metal-induced systemic hypersensitivity in patients” who underwent metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty (MoHRA), “both with and without pseudotumor by measuring lymphocyte

In 2013, a paper published in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research titled “The natural history of inflammatory pseudotumors in asymptomatic patients after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.” by SA Almousa et al. provides background for itself, stating in part “Although pseudotumors have been reported in 32% of asymptomatic metal-on-metal hips, the natural history of asymptomatic

An article appearing in the May, 2013 edition of Orthopedics titled “Prevalence of adverse reactions to metal debris following metal-on-metal THA.” by M. Hasegawa et al. lives up to its title and aimed to “determine the prevalence of adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) following large-diameter metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.”

In recent years,

In a 2008 article published by J. Antoniou et al. in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery titled “Metal ion levels in the blood of patients after hip resurfacing: a comparison between twenty-eight and thirty-six-millimeter-head metal-on-metal prostheses.”, the authors write “Metal ion toxicity, metal hypersensitivity, and metal carcinogenicity are causes for concern

In a 2011 report by JM Smolders et al. published in Acta Orthopaedica titled “Metal ion levels and functional results after either resurfacing hip arthroplasty or conventional metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.”, a team of medical researchers aimed to determine whether larger cup sizes in metal-on-metal hip replacements led to higher levels of metal ions

In 2011, a paper titled “Early failure of articular surface replacement XL total hip arthroplasty.” in The Journal of Arthroplasty by GD Steele et al., stated “The ASR (articular surface replacement) XL (DePuy, Warsaw, Ind) metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty offers the advantage of stability and increased motion. However, an alarming number of early failures