Last summer, Developmental Psychobiology published a piece by S. Brummelte and a team from University of British Columbia (Vancouver) titled “Antidepressant use during pregnancy and serotonin transporter genotype (SLC6A4) affect newborn serum reelin levels.” exploring contributing genetic factors to susceptibility for SSRI-induced birth defects.  To-date, a number of studies have shown that in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs) like Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft is linked to birth defects, but this paper presents the idea that babies with certain genetic profiles are more likely to have birth defects, given prenatal SSRI exposure.

The team states, “This study was undertaken to determine whether altered early serotonin signaling either via gestational serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) exposure or genetic variations in the serotonin transporter promoter region (SLC6A4) alters levels of reelin, an important glycoprotein in neurodevelopment, in mothers and their neonates.”

In this study, “Serum reelin protein expression was quantified by immunoblot from maternal and neonatal blood collected at delivery from women taking either an SRI during gestation or controls. SRI-exposed mothers had higher levels of one reelin fragment, while SRI-exposed neonates had lower total reelin levels, particularly in females and reelin levels differed with SLC6A4 genotype. Lower neonatal reelin levels predicted less time spent sleeping and more irritability during neonatal behavioral assessment on Day 6 of life.” (emphasis added)

Brummelte concluded that the “results suggest that prenatal SRI exposure and the SLC6A4 genotype influences reelin protein expression in both the mother and newborn and that this may be reflected in neonatal behavior.” (emphasis added)

Due to the fact that SSRI manufacturers have failed time and again to warn women of these and other serious risks, SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed by the thousands.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a birth defect, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the compassion, resources, and experience required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

SSRIs and SSRI Birth Defects

In the past decade, dozens of peer-reviewed reports have demonstrated that in utero exposure to a mother’s selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs is associated with an increased risk for a number of congenital malformations (birth defects), particularly heart malformations.

SSRI drugs are used to treat a variety of psychiatric

A 2008 article appearing in the August edition of Prescrire International titled “SSRI antidepressants and persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns.” further examines the adverse effects of exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs) during pregnancy.  In recent decades, a number of prominent studies have linked heart defects to SSRIs, but many other negative consequences have been identified as well.

Here is the abstract of the aforementioned article in full, as available on PubMed Health, a service of the United States National Library of Medicine and The National Institutes of Health:

“(1) The list of adverse effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants in pregnant women and their newborns continues to grow; (2) It was already known that, when taken towards the end of pregnancy, SSRIs could cause spontaneously resolving neonatal disorders, particularly neurological problems; (3) A case-control study has shown an association between maternal exposure to SSRI antidepressants after the 20th week of pregnancy and neonatal persistent pulmonary hypertension, with a 6-fold increase in the risk. Another study has provided similar results; (4) Diagnosis of depression must be made with care during pregnancy, and it should be remembered that not all patients with depression require drug therapy.”

Citing a six-fold increased risk for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), this study can be used in an SSRI birth defect lawsuit to illustrate that the manufacturers of drugs like Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft knew, or should have known, the risks related to their products and failed to act.

PPHN is a birth defect wherein a newborn does not adapt to breathing outside the womb.  According to Medscape, a renowned medical information database, the disease is characterized as follows:

“Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is defined as the failure of the normal circulatory transition that occurs after birth. It is a syndrome characterized by marked pulmonary hypertension that causes hypoxemia and right-to-left intracardiac shunting of blood.

Signs and symptoms

PPHN is often associated with the following signs and symptoms of perinatal distress:

  • Asphyxia

  • Tachypnea, respiratory distress

  • Loud, single second heart sound (S2) or a harsh systolic murmur (secondary to tricuspid regurgitation)

  • Low Apgar scores

  • Meconium staining

  • Cyanosis; poor cardiac function and perfusion

  • Systemic hypotension

  • Symptoms of shock

Idiopathic persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn can present without signs of acute perinatal distress. Marked lability in oxygenation is frequently part of the clinical history.

Diagnosis

Suspect PPHN whenever the level of hypoxemia is out of proportion to the level of pulmonary disease. Clinically, PPHN is most often recognized in term or near-term neonates, but it can occur in premature neonates, albeit infrequently.

In contrast to adult primary pulmonary hypertension, the newborn syndrome is not defined by a specific pressure of the pulmonary circulation. The diagnosis is confirmed regardless of the pulmonary arterial pressure, as long as it is accompanied by right-to-left shunt and absence of congenital heart disease.[1]

Echocardiography is considered the most reliable, convenient, and noninvasive test to establish the diagnosis, assess cardiac function, and exclude an associated structural heart disease.

Laboratory testing

  • Arterial blood gas levels (through indwelling line): To assess the pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial gas (PaCO2), and the partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)

  • Complete blood count with differential: To evaluate for high hematocrit level (polycythemia and hyperviscosity syndrome may lead to or exacerbate PPHN); to determine whether an underlying sepsis or pneumonia is present

  • Coagulation studies (eg, platelet count, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio): To assess for coagulopathy (increased disease severity)

  • Serum electrolytes (eg, calcium) and glucose levels

Imaging studies

  • Chest radiography: To assess for presence of underlying parenchymal lung disease (eg, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, surfactant deficiency) and/or to exclude underlying disorders (eg, congenital diaphragmatic hernia)

  • Echocardiography: To screen and assist in making the diagnosis of PPHN; assist in defining the anatomy of the pulmonary veins; and rule out associated partial/total anomalous pulmonary venous return before initiating extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy (ECMO)

  • Echocardiography with Doppler flow: To assess presence/direction of the intracardiac shunt at the ductus arteriosus and foramen ovale, as well as estimate the pulmonary arterial systolic/diastolic pressures

  • Cranial ultrasonography: To assess for intraventricular bleeding and for peripheral areas of hemorrhage or infarct before initiating (ECMO)

  • Cranial ultrasonography with Doppler flow: To assess whether a nonhemorrhagic infarct is present

  • Brain computed tomography scanning or magnetic resonance imaging: To evaluate for central nervous system injury

Procedures

  • Cardiac catheterization: To exclude congenital heart disease (eg, obstructed anomalous pulmonary venous return, pulmonary vein stenosis) when echocardiographic findings are not definitive

Management

The treatment strategy for PPHN is aimed at maintaining adequate systemic blood pressure, decreasing pulmonary vascular resistance, ensuring oxygen release to tissues, and minimizing lesions induced by high levels of inspired oxygen and ventilator high pressure settings.

General management principles include the following:

  • Continuous monitoring of oxygenation, blood pressure, and perfusion

  • Maintaining a normal body temperature

  • Correction of electrolytes/glucose abnormalities and metabolic acidosis

  • Nutritional support

  • Minimal stimulation/handling of the newborn

  • Minimal use of invasive procedures (eg, suctioning)

Medical therapy

PPHN treatment may consist of the following:

  • Inotropic support (eg, dopamine [first line], dobutamine, milrinone)

  • Surfactant administration: For newborns with parenchymal lung disease

  • High-frequency ventilation: Used in newborns with underlying parenchymal lung disease and low lung volumes; therapy is best in centers with clinicians experienced in achieving/maintaining optimal lung distention

  • ECMO: Used when optimal ventilatory support fails to maintain acceptable oxygenation and perfusion[2, 3]

  • Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation: To maintain normal functional residual capacity by recruiting areas of atelectasis; to avoid overexpansion

  • Correction of acidosis and alkalosis

  • Induced paralysis: Controversial; paralytic agents are typically reserved for newborns who cannot be treated with sedatives alone (Note: paralysis, especially with pancuronium, may promote atelectasis of dependent lung regions and promote ventilation-perfusion mismatch.)

  • Hearing evaluation

  • Postdischarge neurologic evaluation by a neurologist or developmental pediatrician

Pharmacotherapy

  • Pulmonary vasodilators (eg, inhaled nitric oxide)

  • Vasodilators potentially beneficial for PPHN after the newborn period (eg, prostacyclin, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists)”

This is by no means the first study to link PPHN with prenatal SSRI exposure.  If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with PPHN or another congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the compassion, resources, and experience required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Looking through articles today at PubMed Health, a service of the United States National Library of Medicine and The National Institutes of Health, I found a piece titled “The management of depression during pregnancy: a report from the American Psychiatric Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.” published by K.A. Yonkers et al. (2009), a team from the Department of Psychiatry, Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale School of Medicine.  This article originally appeared in the September, 2009 edition of Obstetrics and Gynecology and discusses risks of SSRI use during pregnancy.  To-date, a number of articles have found that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs) in pregnancy is linked to an increased risk for a range of serious birth defects.

The team writes, “Representatives from the American Psychiatric Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and a consulting developmental pediatrician collaborated to review English language articles on fetal and neonatal outcomes associated with depression and antidepressant treatment during childbearing.”

Importantly, Yonkers et al. (2009) note that “Both depressive symptoms and antidepressant exposure are associated with fetal growth changes and shorter gestations, but the majority of studies that evaluated antidepressant risks were unable to control for the possible effects of a depressive disorder. Short-term neonatal irritability and neurobehavioral changes are also linked with maternal depression and antidepressant treatment. Several studies report fetal malformations in association with first trimester antidepressant exposure … The association between [Paxil] and cardiac defects is more often found in studies that included all malformations rather than clinically significant malformations. Late gestational use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants is associated with transitory neonatal signs and a low risk for persistent pulmonary hypertension in the newborn.” (emphasis added)

Unfortunately, thousands of women around the world have used SSRIs including Paxil during pregnancy unaware of the risks for heart defects and adaptation problems.  As a result, Paxil® birth defect lawsuits and SSRI birth defect lawsuits are currently being filed in great number.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a birth defect or who faced perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Titled “Infant serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) promoter genotype is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes after prenatal exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications.”, a paper by T.F. Oberlander et al. (2008) appearing in Molecular Psychiatry, examines a genetic dimension of the adverse effects of prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs).  This team from The University of British Columbia (Vancouver) discusses adverse birth outcomes related to exposure to these drugs.

The team writes “Reduced Apgar scores and birth weight, increased risk of respiratory distress, jitteriness and increased tone have been reported in up to 30% of neonates with prenatal exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant medications.”  To be clear, “SRI” is for our purposes equivalent to “SSRI.”  Continuing, Oberlander states “In adults, effects of these medications may be related to the genotype for the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) promoter. In this study we investigated whether SLC6A4 genotype influences the risk for adverse outcomes in neonates with prenatal SRI exposure.”

Comparing 37 SSRI-exposed children to 47 non-exposed children, Oberlander found that different genotypes (versions) of the SLC6A4 gene were associated with different neonatal outcomes, given SSRI exposure: “Reduced 5 min Apgar scores were observed in exposed neonates and this was moderated by the ss genotype (P<0.001). Birth weight was lower in exposed ls neonates (P=0.008). Risk for respiratory symptoms (respiratory distress and rapid breathing) was higher in exposed neonates with the ll genotype compared to non-exposed neonates (P<0.05) and risk for neuromotor symptoms increased in exposed ss neonates (P<0.026).”

Noting that “These relationships remained when controlling for maternal mood during pregnancy, length of gestational medication exposure and gestational age at birth and cesarean section rate” the team concluded that “Prenatal SRI exposure was associated with adverse neonatal outcomes and these effects were moderated by infant SLC6A4 genotype” and “Relationships between polymorphisms and specific outcomes varied during the neonatal period, suggesting that beyond apparent gene-medication interactions, multiple mechanisms contribute to adverse neonatal outcomes following prenatal SRI exposure.”

Since so many women have used SSRIs while pregnant unaware of the increased risk for adverse neonatal outcomes, in part because manufacturers have failed to adequately warn, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

I recently came across a 2000 article from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill by J.R. Moiseiwitsch et al., titled “The role of serotonin and neurotransmitters during craniofacial development.”.  This article, published in Critical Reviews in Oral Biology and Medicine, demonstrates how prenatal exposure to SSRI drugs affects craniofacial development, all too often resulting in birth defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate.

The team writes, “Several neurotransmitters, in particular serotonin (5-HT), have demonstrated multiple functions during early development and mid-gestational craniofacial morphogenesis. Early studies indicated that 5-HT is present in the oocyte, where it appears to function as a regulator of cell cleavage. Later, it has a significant role during gastrulation, during which there are significant areas of 5-HT uptake in the primitive streak. Subsequently, in association with neurulation, 5-HT uptake is seen in the floor plate of the developing neural tube.”

This may help show how gestational exposure to SSRIs can lead to neural tube defects, such as spina bifida.

Continuing, it is stated that “During neural crest formation and branchial arch formation, 5-HT has been demonstrated to facilitate cell migration and stimulate cell differentiation. During morphogenesis of the craniofacial structures, 5-HT stimulates dental development and may aid in cusp formation. All of the most commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs inhibit serotonin uptake, yet they do not appear to cause major craniofacial malformations in vivo. Given the wide spectrum of effects that 5-HT has during development, it is difficult to understand why these anti-depressants are not major teratogens. Redundancy within the system may allow receptor and uptake pathways to function normally even with lower than normal levels of circulating serotonin. Serotonin-binding proteins, that are expressed in most craniofacial regions at critical times during craniofacial development, may have a buffering capacity that maintains adequate 5-HT tissue concentrations over a wide range of 5-HT serum concentrations.”

Stating that “Dental development appears to be particularly sensitive to even small fluctuations in concentrations of 5-HT. Therefore, it may be that children of patients who have received selective serotonergic re-uptake inhibitors (such as Prozac and Zoloft) or the less selective tricyclic anti-depressant drugs (such as Elavil) would be at a higher risk for developmental dental defects such as anodontia and hypodontia”, we can see how SSRIs are linked to craniofacial birth defects.

Since so many women have used SSRIs unaware of the risk for birth defects, SSRI birth defect lawsuits are currently being filed around the world.  If you or a loved one used SSRIs such as Prozac or Zoloft and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Over the past two decades, a number of medical research teams have linked SSRI use during pregnancy and birth defects, developmental disorders like autism, and adverse birth outcomes such as neonatal abstinence syndrome.  And, a December 2002 article in American Journal of Psychiatry titled “Outcomes of prenatal antidepressant exposure.” published by a team led by G.E. Simon from The Center of Health Studies (Seattle, Washington) gives more insight into the link between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and birth defects.

This study team writes, “Within a group-model health maintenance organization, all infants with apparent prenatal exposure to tricyclic or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants were frequency matched to an unexposed comparison group by year of birth, maternal age, and mother’s lifetime use of antidepressant drugs and mental health care. A structured blind review of mothers’ and infants’ medical records examined perinatal outcomes, congenital malformations, and developmental delay.”

After careful statistical analyses, G.E. Simon et al. (2002) found that “Exposure to SSRIs was associated with a 0.9-week decrease in mean gestational age, a 175-g decrease in mean birth weight, and a 0.29 decrease in mean Apgar,” concluding simply that “SSRI exposure during pregnancy was associated with earlier delivery and consequent lower birth weight”, “Third-trimester SSRI exposure was also associated with lower Apgar scores” and “Women considering taking SSRIs during pregnancy may balance any higher fetal risk against the risk of persistent or recurrent depression.”

Due to the fact that the manufacturers of many SSRI drugs have failed time and again to adequately warm women of these risks, SSRI birth defect lawsuits are being filed around the world seeking compensation for undue injury to innocent newborns.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

In 2009, S. Alwan and J.M. Friedman, a research duo from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, published a study titled “Safety of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy.” in CNS Drugs that provided important insight into the link between gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (such as Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft) and serious congenital malformations.

Because it’s written in plain English and not-so-scientific terms, I have included the abstract below:

“Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are among the most commonly used medications, with a prescription frequency of 2.3% in pregnant women. Although most babies born to women who take SSRIs during pregnancy are normal, there is accumulating evidence that maternal SSRI treatment during pregnancy may cause adverse reproductive outcomes.

[ ]

Maternal SSRI treatment during the first trimester has been implicated in increased risks of birth defects, specifically cardiac abnormalities, in the infant, whereas third-trimester treatment has been linked to various neonatal complications, including symptoms of neonatal withdrawal and toxicity, prematurity, low birth weight and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Although data on neurobehavioural and long-term cognitive problems among children of women who were treated with SSRIs during pregnancy remain limited, the possibility of such functional abnormalities is an additional concern.

[ ]

On the other hand, untreated maternal depression also carries serious risks for both the mother and the baby, and SSRIs are one of the best available treatments. Thus, pregnant women who require treatment for depression and their physicians often face a difficult choice regarding the use of SSRIs.”

While untreated maternal depression does in fact constitute a serious problem, it is of utmost concern that expecting mothers make informed decisions regarding drug use during pregnancy.  And because the manufacturers of many SSRI drugs have failed time and again to adequately inform women of these risks, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Searching the phrase “sertraline malformation” in PubMed, an online medical literature database curated by the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health, this morning I came across an article titled “Serotonin as a regulator of craniofacial morphogenesis: site specific malformations following exposure to serotonin uptake inhibitors.” by D.L. Shuey et al., appearing in the October, 1992 edition of Teratology.  To be clear, “sertraline” is the chemical name for the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), Zoloft®.

Studying mice, the team found that “Exposure of mouse embryos in whole embryo culture to sertraline, at a concentration (10 microM) which produced no evidence of general embryotoxicity, caused craniofacial malformations consistent with direct action at 5-HT uptake sites. Two other 5-HT uptake inhibitors, fluoxetine and amitriptyline, produced similar defects.”

Many other studies published in recent decades have also linked prenatal SSRI exposure to craniofacial malformations such as cleft lip and cleft palate. The researchers concluded “it appears that inhibition of 5-HT uptake into craniofacial epithelia may produce developmental defects by interference with serotonergic regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions important for normal craniofacial morphogenesis.”

Because so many women have used SSRIs unaware of the risks associated with gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, a number of SSRI lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

In 2011, a team of medical researchers from Australia led by L. Colvin, published a study titled “Dispensing patterns and pregnancy outcomes for women dispensed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy.” in Birth Defects Research, providing further evidence of a link between prenatal exposure to SSRI drugs and birth defects.  For clarity, “SSRIs” stands for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a class of psychotropic medications aimed at raising levels of synaptic serotonin, a neurotransmitter key in the regulation of mood, sleep, and appetite, and that plays an important role in fetal development, particularly cardiovascular development.  Some common SSRI drugs are Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Effexor, and Zoloft.

The authors state “Using data linkage of population-based health datasets from Western Australia and a national pharmaceutical claims dataset, our study included 123,405 pregnancies from 2002 to 2005. There were 3764 children born to 3703 women who were dispensed an SSRI during their pregnancy.”

Results showed that women who used SSRI drugs during pregnancy were 40% more likely to give birth prematurely, and 20% more likely to bear children with low birth weight.  Further, “There was an increased risk of major cardiovascular defects (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.3). The children of women dispensed citalopram during the first trimester had an increased risk of vesicoureteric reflux (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.3-7.6).”

That means that heart defects were 60% more common amongst babies born to mothers who used SSRIs during pregnancy, and that babies whose mothers used Celexa (citalopram) during the first three months of pregnancy were more than three times as likely to be born with vesicoureteric reflux.

Because many women have used Celexa or other SSRI drugs during pregnancy unaware of these risks, a number of Celexa® birth defects lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Celexa and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Celexa® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.