May 2014

In 2011, a team of medical researchers from Australia led by L. Colvin, published a study titled “Dispensing patterns and pregnancy outcomes for women dispensed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy.” in Birth Defects Research, providing further evidence of a link between prenatal exposure to SSRI drugs and birth defects.  For clarity, “SSRIs” stands for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a class of psychotropic medications aimed at raising levels of synaptic serotonin, a neurotransmitter key in the regulation of mood, sleep, and appetite, and that plays an important role in fetal development, particularly cardiovascular development.  Some common SSRI drugs are Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Effexor, and Zoloft.

The authors state “Using data linkage of population-based health datasets from Western Australia and a national pharmaceutical claims dataset, our study included 123,405 pregnancies from 2002 to 2005. There were 3764 children born to 3703 women who were dispensed an SSRI during their pregnancy.”

Results showed that women who used SSRI drugs during pregnancy were 40% more likely to give birth prematurely, and 20% more likely to bear children with low birth weight.  Further, “There was an increased risk of major cardiovascular defects (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.3). The children of women dispensed citalopram during the first trimester had an increased risk of vesicoureteric reflux (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.3-7.6).”

That means that heart defects were 60% more common amongst babies born to mothers who used SSRIs during pregnancy, and that babies whose mothers used Celexa (citalopram) during the first three months of pregnancy were more than three times as likely to be born with vesicoureteric reflux.

Because many women have used Celexa or other SSRI drugs during pregnancy unaware of these risks, a number of Celexa® birth defects lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Celexa and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Celexa® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

In 2004, an article by B. Källén, a Swedish researcher, titled “Neonate characteristics after maternal use of antidepressants in late pregnancy.” in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine provides insight into the danger of perinatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (SSRIs).

The stated objective was “To investigate neonatal outcomes in 997 infants (987 mothers) after maternal use of antidepressants based on prospectively recorded information in antenatal care documents,” citing that “Exposure to antidepressants during the third trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk for adverse birth outcomes, including preterm birth, respiratory distress, and hypoglycemia.”

Results showed that “increased risk for preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 1.96) and low birth weight (OR, 1.98) was verified”, meaning that the risk for premature birth with gestational SSRI exposure is doubled and also the risk for low birth weight with gestational SSRI exposure is doubled.

Further, “An increased risk for a low Apgar score (OR, 2.33), respiratory distress (OR, 2.21), neonatal convulsions (OR,1.90), and hypoglycemia (OR, 1.62) was found, the latter especially after exposure to tricyclic drugs, but no significant effect on the frequency of neonatal jaundice was seen (OR, 1.13).”

Due to the fact that so many women used SSRI drugs unaware of the risk for adverse perinatal outcomes, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

In 2006, a team of Spanish medical researchers published a report titled “[Neonatal withdrawal syndrome to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: case report and literature review].” in Revista de Neurologica, wherein a child who suffered SSRI withdrawal symptoms after birth is presented along with a review of relevant literature.  “SSRI” stands for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs.  Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in mood regulation, appetite, and sleep, as well as prenatal development – particularly heart development.  Drugs that alter levels of serotonin in a developing baby’s body have been shown to interfere with cardiovascular development.

For background, the team writes “A SSRI-related neonatal syndrome has been described secondary to withdrawal in infants exposed to these drugs during the last trimester of pregnancy.”

“An infant whose mother received treatment with paroxetine (20 mg/kg/day) during the third trimester was born prematurely and presented withdrawal symptoms within few days after birth. Symptoms were irritability with constant crying, shivering, increased muscle tone, coreiform movements and feeding problems.”  Thankfully, after about two weeks, symptoms resolved and the child recovered.  For clarity, “paroxetine” is the chemical name for Paxil.

Concluding, the team writes “In utero exposure to SSRIs during the last trimester through delivery may result in a self-limited neonatal behavioural syndrome that can be managed with supportive care. Its increasing incidence in neonates may be due to a greater frequency of its gestational use. All these neonates should be followed-up closely looking forward withdrawal symptoms in the first days of life.”

Because many women have used SSRIs such as Paxil unaware of the risks for perinatal complications and birth defects, a number of Paxil® birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Paxil and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who suffered perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Paxil® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

A 2002 piece published by A.M. Costei and a team of medical researchers from Toronto in the medical journal Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine tited “Perinatal outcome following third trimester exposure to paroxetine.” further demonstrates possible adverse effects of in utero exposure to Paxil.  (“Paroxetine” is the chemical name for Paxil, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or SSRI, for short.)

Studying “Fifty-five pregnant women counseled prospectively by the Motherisk program in Toronto, Ontario, regarding third-trimester exposure to paroxetine and their infants,” but after some exclusion, “A comparison group of 27 women using paroxetine during the first or second trimester and 27 women using nonteratogenic drugs were matched for maternal age, gravity, parity, social drug use, and nonteratogenic drug use.”

Results showed that “Of the 55 neonates exposed to paroxetine in late gestation, 12 had complications necessitating intensive treatment and prolonged hospitalization. The most prevalent clinical picture was respiratory distress (n = 9), followed by hypoglycemia (n = 2), and jaundice (n = 1).”

In the comparison group (control group), only 3 babies suffered similar symptoms.  As such, statistics showed that “third-trimester exposure to paroxetine was associated with neonatal distress (odds ratio, 9.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-79.3)”, meaning babies exposed to Paxil were nearly 10 times as likely to have adverse perinatal outcomes.

If you or a loved one used Paxil and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation through a Paxil® birth defect lawsuit.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Paxil® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

In the March-April 2006 edition of Consumer Magazine (of the United States Food and Drug Administration), an important update was provided regarding the safety of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for developing babies.

Here is the full update, titled “Paxil and the Risk of Birth Defects”:

“Early results of new studies for Paxil (paroxetine) suggest that the drug increases the risk of birth defects, particularly heart defects, when women take it during the first three months of pregnancy. Paxil is approved to treat depression and several other psychiatric disorders. The FDA is gathering additional data and waiting for final results of the studies to better understand the higher risk of birth defects.

The FDA advises health care professionals to discuss this potential risk with women who plan to become pregnant or are in the first three months of pregnancy. Health care professionals should consider discontinuing Paxil and switching to another antidepressant in these patients. But for some women who have already been taking Paxil, the benefits of continuing the drug may be greater than the potential risk to the fetus.

“Stopping these medicines on your own can sometimes create more problems than it solves,” says Sandra Kweder, M.D., deputy director of the FDA’s Office of New Drugs. “A lot of these medicines are associated with withdrawal syndromes, which can be very problematic for many patients, so stopping is something that needs to be monitored carefully by your doctor.”

The FDA advises health care professionals not to prescribe Paxil in women who are in the first three months of pregnancy or are planning pregnancy, unless other treatment options are not appropriate.

Early results of two studies indicate that women who took Paxil during the first three months of pregnancy were about one and a half to two times as likely to have a baby with a heart defect as women who received other antidepressants or women in the general population. Most of the heart defects reported in these studies were holes in the walls of the chambers of the heart (atrial and ventricular septal defects).

The FDA has asked Paxil’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) of Research Triangle Park, N.C., to change the drug’s pregnancy category from C to D, which is a stronger warning. Category D means that studies in pregnant women have demonstrated a risk to the fetus.

GSK updated the drug’s labeling in September 2005 to add data from one study. As additional data have become available, the label has been changed to reflect the latest data.

Visit www.fda.gov/cder/drug/advisory/paroxetine200512.htm for more information.”

Because many women have used Paxil unaware of the risk for these birth defects, a number of Paxil® birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Paxil and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who suffered perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Paxil® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

A 2005 study titled “Neonatal signs after late in utero exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitors: literature review and implications for clinical applications.” published by EL Moses-Kolko et al. in Journal of the American Medical Association sheds light on perinatal complications associated with in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

The authors state “A neonatal behavioral syndrome linked to in utero serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) exposure during the last trimester of pregnancy has been identified” and warns that “The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and drug manufacturers have recently agreed to a class labeling change for SRIs, which include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), to include information about potential adverse events in neonates exposed in utero.”

Reviewing 13 case studies published between 1966 and 2004 (describing 18 individuals), the researchers found that “Compared with early gestational SRI exposure or no exposure, late SRI exposure carries an overall risk ratio of 3.0 (95% CI, 2.0-4.4) for a neonatal behavioral syndrome”, noting that “The most SRI-related neonatal case reports involved fluoxetine and paroxetine exposures.”  This means that babies born to mothers who used SSRIs including Prozac (fluoxetine) and Paxil (paroxetine) were three times as likely to suffer neonatal behavioral syndrome.

Researchers described that “Neonates primarily display central nervous system, motor, respiratory, and gastrointestinal signs that are usually mild and disappear by 2 weeks of age. Medical management has consisted primarily of supportive care in special care nurseries. A severe syndrome that consists of seizures, dehydration, excessive weight loss, hyperpyrexia, or intubation is rare in term infants (1/313 quantifiable cases).”

Because many women have used SSRIs like Paxil or Prozac unaware of the risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome, a number of Paxil® birth defect lawsuits and Prozac® birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used Paxil or Prozac and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or neonatal behavioral syndrome, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Paxil® birth defects lawyers and Prozac® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

This morning, I found a number of studies on PubMed (a medical research database curated by the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health) that linked prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (“SSRIs,” for short) and adverse birth outcomes.  Over the past two decades, many researchers have linked SSRI exposure and birth defects, and summaries of dozens of those studies are readily available by following the preceding link.

First, a 2006 piece by Tango et al. (a research team from Switzerland) titled “Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in pregnancy” published in Revue Médicale Suisse.  Studying the effects of in utero SSRI exposure, the team found that, “During organogenesis, paroxetine (Deroxat, Paxil, or generics) was associated with a significantly increased risk of major congenital malformations” and stated “After the time of organogenesis, SSRIs have also been associated to risks. Of these, the more frequent is neonatal toxicity, while pulmonary hypertension in the newborn is likely to be the more severe.” (emphasis added)  To be clear, “organogenesis” is the stage in neonatal development when organs begin to develop, and pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is a condition of newborns wherein the neonate fails to adequately adapt to breathing outside the womb.

An article titled “Neonatal intraventricular haemorrhage associated with maternal use of paroxetine” published in the November, 2003 edition of British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology by Duijvestijn et al. presented a case report, stating, “Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been reported to inhibit serotonin uptake into platelets, resulting in decreased platelet function. We report a case of a large intraventricular haemorrhage in a 6-h-old boy, whose mother used paroxetine during pregnancy.”  After seven weeks of life and a great deal of medical treatment,  the infant still required “ventricular drainage and showed severe neurological abnormalities with stereotype movements, hypotony of the legs, epilepsy and abnormal eye movements with seriously disturbed visual evoked potentials.” (emphasis added)

The researchers stated, “Increased bleeding tendency after use of SSRI has been described previously for users as well as for in utero exposed fetus.  The capacity of paroxetine to cross the placenta is illustrated by reports of neonatal symptoms associated with maternal use of paroxetine.”  And as “No other predisposing factors could be discovered”, the team warned against use of SSRI drugs in last trimester.

In 2003, Y. Sari et al. published “Serotonin and its transporter on proliferation of fetal heart cells.” in International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience where they “showed for the first time that the cultured heart cells, express serotonin transporter (5-HTT), which confirmed the previously observed accumulation of 5-HT in developing heart.”  The team concluded that the “study indicated that the blockade of 5-HT uptake by paroxetine decreased the number of BrdU-im cells and MF20-im cells. These data indicate a role of 5-HT and 5-HTT on heart development” and “Abnormal 5-HT level or misuse of 5-HT uptake blocker may alter the heart development.”  This helps demonstrate how serotonin reuptake inhibitors may hinder heart development, leading to cardiovascular malformations being linked to prenatal exposure to SSRI drugs.

A 2006 piece by Knoppert et al., a team from London, Ontario, published in Therapeutic Drug MonitoringParoxetine toxicity in a newborn after in utero exposure: clinical symptoms correlate with serum levels.”, wherein a case report was presented.  About their report, the team states, “A case of an infant who was exposed to paroxetine during pregnancy” that “supports the notion of serotonin toxicity and is believed to be the first report that substantiates clinical symptoms with serum levels of the offending SSRI.”

Finally, an article titled “Birth outcomes after prenatal exposure to antidepressant medication.” published in American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology by V. Hendrick et al. (2003), a team from University of California (Los Angeles) further connected prenatal exposure to SSRI drugs and adverse birth outcomes.  The authors write “The purpose of this study was to examine prospectively the incidence of congenital anomalies and neonatal complications after prenatal exposure to antidepressant medication.”  Results showed that most birth outcomes among prenatally-exposed infants were similar to children in the general population, but about 3% of children had low birth weight, and “low birth weight infants had been exposed to relatively high doses of fluoxetine (40-80 mg/d) throughout pregnancy”. (emphasis added)  For clarity, “fluoxetine” is the chemical name for Prozac.

Because the manufacturers of many SSRIs have failed time and again to warn women of the risks associated with their products, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits have been filed.

If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who suffered an otherwise adverse birth outcome, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Recently, while researching the connection between maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy and birth defects, I came across this letter to the editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry.  Titled “Should Paroxetine Be Used to Treat Depression During Pregnancy?”, published November 2008, authors Barbara Mintzes and Jon Jureidini suggest that though some studies on the safety of SSRIs for developing babies present conflicting evidence, shouldn’t we err on the side of caution?

Here is the complete letter:

“To the Editor: In the June 2008 issue of the Journal, Adrienne Einarson, R.N. et al. (1) concluded that the existing evidence does not suggest an association between the use of paroxetine during pregnancy and congenital cardiovascular defects. Their conclusion was based on an observational study and five previous cohort studies. The authors stressed the need to treat depression during pregnancy and stated that if appropriate treatment includes paroxetine, the findings of their study “should reassure women and their health care providers” (1, p. 752). This endorsement is at odds with regulatory warnings (2).

The design and reporting of the study raise questions pertaining to claimed results. No data are provided regarding 1) baseline characteristics of exposed women and unexposed comparison women, 2) whether the analysis is intention-to-treat or per protocol, 3) loss to follow-up, or 4) proportion with evaluable outcomes. Both the exposure levels and procedures to select comparison women were unclear. Additionally, the outcome assessment was not blinded to exposure, and treatment for ambiguous diagnoses was unclear.

Einarson et al. included a secondary analysis of five cohort studies of paroxetine exposure during pregnancy. Although four of these studies included comparison groups and two reported significant increases in congenital malformation rates among exposed women (3, 4), these data were omitted. The authors reported a subset of available observational studies, and the selection criteria were unclear.

If harm from paroxetine use during pregnancy cannot be excluded based on the evidence provided, can benefit be assumed? To our knowledge, no randomized controlled trial has examined whether paroxetine treats depression during pregnancy more effectively than placebo, psychotherapy, or alternative treatment/therapy. Einarson et al. stated that randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted “for obvious reasons” (1, p. 751). We question the assumption that treatments should be offered to pregnant women with less evidence of benefit than those treatments offered to nonpregnant women. More, not less, caution is needed to ensure that potential benefit outweighs potential harm.

The authors also cited a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) (5) reporting high rates of depression relapse after discontinuation of paroxetine during pregnancy. The study was not randomized, neither patients nor treating doctors were blinded, and patients were briefed about the “risk of depressive relapse associated with discontinuation of antidepressant therapy.” Additionally, no attempts to distinguish relapse from drug discontinuation syndrome were described.

Neither the safety nor effectiveness of paroxetine treatment during pregnancy has been established. Since studies conducted in a range of settings have indicated potential harm, should we not adopt a cautious approach to further exposure, rather than requiring certainty about harm?

1.Einarson A, Pistelli A, DeSantis M, Malm H, Paulus WD, Panchaud A, Kennedy D, Einarson TR, Koren G: Evaluation of the risk of congenital cardiovascular defects associated with the use of paroxetine in pregnancy. Am J Psychiatry 2008; 165: 749–752

2.US Food and Drug Administration: FDA Advising of Risk of Birth Defects With Paxil, P05-97. Rockville, Md, FDA News, 2005. http://69.20.19.211/bbs/topics/NEWS/2005/NEW01270

3.Kallen BA, Olausson P: Maternal use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in early pregnancy and infant congenital malformations. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol 2007; 79:301–308

4.GlaxoSmithKline: Epidemiology Study: Paroxetine in the First Trimester and the Prevalence of Congenital Malformations, EPI40404. http://ctr.gsk.co.uk/Summary/paroxetine/studylist.asp

5.Cohen LS, Altshuler LL, Harlow BL, Nonacs R, Newport DJ, Viguera AC, Suri R, Burt VK, Hendrick V, Reminick AM, Loughead A, Vitonis AF, Stowe ZN: Relapse of major depression during pregnancy in women who maintain or discontinue antidepressant treatment. JAMA 2006; 295: 499–507”

Since many people have used SSRI drugs aware of the risks associated with their use during pregnancy, many SSRI birth defect lawsuits are currently being filed.  If you or a loved one used SSRIs and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation or who had perinatal complications, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

Looking through PubMed, a medical literature database curated by the National Library of Medicine and the US National Institutes of Health this morning, I found a number of articles citing the link between SSRI drug use during pregnancy and the risk for adverse birth outcomes.  (For other articles I’ve written on the connection between SSRIs and birth defects, follow the preceding link.)  Most doctors find that paroxetine (Paxil) is the most likely to cause congenital malformation or otherwise adverse fetal outcomes.

Here, I will cite four of the studies I’ve found today.

First, a study by M. Simoncelli et al., a research team from The University of Montreal, published in a 2010 edition of Current Drug Safety titled “Antidepressant use during pregnancy: a critical systematic review of the literature.” made insightful comments.  The team writes “Over the past 15 years, the number of studies investigating the potential teratogenic effects of antidepressants has drastically increased” and while, “Most antidepressants do not pose a major teratogenic risk … The use of paroxetine during organogenesis has been linked to an increase in the risk of cardiovascular malformations.”  For clarity, “teratogenic” means defect-causing, and “organogenesis” is the stage in neonatal development when organs begin to develop.

A 2008 study I found from Duke University, published by D.M. Marks et al. in the November edition of Expert Opinion on Drug Safety titled “Paroxetine: safety and tolerability issues.” purports, “Paroxetine is the most potent inhibitor of serotonin re-uptake among the now available SSRIs” and “Recent data suggest that paroxetine treatment leads to increased rates of congenital malformations”.  Again, not looking good for Paxil use during pregnancy.

In 2007, B. Källén et al. published a study titled “The safety of antidepressant drugs during pregnancy.” in the July edition of Expert Opinion on Drug Safety, again linking Paxil to birth defects.  This team from The University of Lund (Sweden) states “It is unlikely that any marked teratogenic effect occurs [with neonatal exposure to SSRI drugs] with the possible exception of an increased risk for cardiovascular defects after maternal use of clomipramine or paroxetine.”  The team also notes that “An increased risk for preterm birth is seen” and “Transient neonatal symptoms are common after the use of antidepressants in late pregnancy.”

Lastly, S. Davidson et al. (2009) published a study in Pediatric Research titled “Effect of exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in utero on fetal growth: potential role for the IGF-I and HPA axes.” where they aimed “To investigate the possible effect of fetal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on somatic growth and on hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I axes, we compared the anthropometric parameters and hormonal profile of 21 SSRI-exposed infants and 20 matched controls.”  Results showed that “The SSRI group was characterized by lower crown-heel length (p < 0.01), smaller head circumference (p = 0.08), and higher percentage of infants with birth weight, birth length, and head circumference below the 10th percentile”.  Demonstrating prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with adverse birth outcomes, the team concluded that, “The findings may raise concern regarding maternal use of SSRIs during pregnancy.”  (Understandably so.)

Because many women have used Paxil or other SSRI drugs during pregnancy unaware of the risk for adverse birth outcomes or congenital malformations, a number of SSRI birth defect lawsuits are currently being filed.  If you or a loved one used an SSRI during pregnancy, especially Paxil, and gave birth to a child with a congenital malformation, neonatal adaptation syndrome, or another ailment, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of SSRI birth defect lawyers and Paxil® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the compassion, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

An article published in the February, 2010 edition of the medical journal Birth Defects Research titled “First-trimester use of paroxetine and congenital heart defects: a population-based case-control study.” provides further evidence for the connection between paroxetine (Paxil) and cardiovascular birth defects.

This study, conducted by M.K. Bakker et al., a Dutch research team, “performed a case-control study with data from a population-based birth defects registry in the Netherlands. All the children born between 1997 and 2006 were selected. Cases were defined as fetuses and children with isolated heart defects, and the controls were fetuses and children with a genetic disorder with no heart defect.”  Children whose prenatal drug exposure could not be confirmed were excluded, and “First-trimester exposure to paroxetine was compared between cases and controls by calculating adjusted odds ratios (AOR).”

In all, prenatal drug exposure for 678 children with heart defects was compared to 615 children without cardiovascular malformation.  Results showed that “After excluding mothers who used paroxetine outside the first trimester, or who had used another SSRI, we found … a significantly increased risk for atrium septum defects (three exposed cases; AOR, 5.7; 95% CI, 1.4-23.7).”  That means that the risk for atrium septum defects (ASD) was found to be increased 570% for children whose mothers used Paxil during pregnancy, compared to mothers who had not.  For information on this other heart defects linked to Paxil, follow the preceding link.

Because the manufacturers of Paxil have time and again failed to notify women of the risk for birth defects associated with Paxi use during pregnancy, a number of Paxil® birth defect lawsuits have been filed.  If you or a loved one used Paxil and gave birth to a child with a heart defect or another congenital malformation, you may be entitled to significant financial compensation.  For a free, no-obligation case consultation, contact our team of Paxil® birth defects lawyers at the information provided below.  We have the experience, resources, and skills required to win the justice you deserve.  Call today and see how we can help.

(855) 452 – 5529

justinian@dangerousdrugs.us

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.