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Complications of Transvaginal Mesh: a case report

Posted in Vaginal Mesh

An article published in a 2006 edition of the medical journal Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases by Stavros Athanasiou et al titled “Vaginal mesh infection due to Bacteroides melaninogenicus: A case report of another emerging foreign body related infection” details the case of a woman who used transvaginal mesh mesh and subsequently experienced severe infection as a result.[1]

This woman, aged 29 years, required transvaginal mesh in the surgical reconstruction following her “rectocele, cystocele, and uterine prolapse.”[2]  The mesh used in her procedure was polypropylene,[3] a type of transvaginal mesh found to cause vaginal mesh erosion at a rate of over 10%,[4] and ten months after the mesh was put in place, the woman began reporting an “increasing pelvic dragging sensation.”[5]

After review by her physician, it was recommended that she undergo a second surgery to complete an apparently incomplete vaginal reconstructive surgery.

Soon after that operation, symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse subsided and the woman was believed to be recovering well.  Three months after that surgery, “the patient noted an offensive vaginal discharge … and she reported an episode of light vaginal bleeding.  Examination revealed a large mesh erosion of the anterior vaginal wall (2 x 3 cm) … and 2 small erosions of the IVS tape on the posterior vaginal wall. The uterus and the vaginal walls were well supported. A vaginal swab from the area of the exposed mesh was taken and the culture revealed growth of Bacteroides melaninogenicus.”[6]

Once the infection was discovered, the woman was administered antibiotic medications and recovered well.  Twelve months after antibiotics were administered, the woman had not experienced a resurgence of bacterial infection and remains in good health.

While this woman recovered well, vaginal mesh-related infections do not always turn out as such.  And further, thousands of women may face the risk of vaginal mesh-related infection and vaginal mesh erosion unknowingly due to the fact that the manufacturers of many transvaginal mesh products do not provide adequate warnings regarding the safety of their products.

As a result, a number of transvaginal mesh lawsuits are currently being filed.  If you or a loved one used transvaginal mesh and experienced transvaginal mesh erosion or infection, please do not hesitate to contact our team of transvaginal mesh lawyers for a free, no-obligation case consultation.

At your convenience, you may reach our offices by phone at (855) 452-5529 or by e-mail at justinian@dangerousdrugs.us.  Call today and see how we can help.  Our Transvaginal Mesh Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have additional questions about Transvaginal Mesh.


[1] Athanasiou, S. et al. “Vaginal mesh infection due to Bacteroides melaninogenicus: A case report of another emerging foreign body related infection” Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(11-12):1108-10.

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid

[4] Badlani, G. et al. “Mesh complications in female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery and their management: A systematic review” Indian Journal of Urology 28.2 (April-June 2012): p129

[5] Athanasiou, S. et al. “Vaginal mesh infection due to Bacteroides melaninogenicus: A case report of another emerging foreign body related infection” Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(11-12):1108-10.

[6] Ibid.