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Limb Reduction Defects Linked to Zoloft, Celexa

Posted in Celexa Birth Defects, SSRI Birth Defects, Zoloft Birth Defects

Limb reduction deficits are congenital (from birth) malformations of the newborn’s body in which one or more of the limbs does not fully develop, either partially or fully, before birth.[1]  The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in the general population, about 4 babies in every 10,000 are born born with a limb reduction deficit.  Recently, medical research has found that maternal use of certain SSRI drugs can dramatically raise that risk, up to 400% that in the normal population.[2]

The CDC states that “Babies and children with limb reduction defects will face various issues and difficulties, but the extent of these will depend on the location and size of the reduction. Some potential difficulties and problems include:

  • Difficulties with normal development such as motor skills
  • Needing assistance with daily activities such as self-care
  • Limitations with certain movements, sports, or activities
  • Potential emotional and social issues because of physical appearance”[3]

Needless to say, limb reduction deficits are a very serious birth defect.  Treatment usually requires prosthetic limbs,[4] “splints or braces,”[5] “surgery,”[6] or physical therapy.[7]  Limb reduction deficits have also found to be linked to heart defects, omphalocele, and gastroschisis.[8]

SSRIs and Limb Reduction Deficits

In 2007, medical researcher Carol Louik and her team published a study in the New England Journal of Medicine that sought to determine whether maternal use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) drugs during pregnancy caused the risk for birth defects to raise, and made several startling conclusions.  These depression drugs aimed at regulating levels of serotonin in the brain, a neurotransmitter that maintains mood levels, appetite, and sleep, also dispose children to being born with a variety of major heart defects and other ailments.

Concerning limb reduction deficits specifically, Louik and her team determined that maternal use of Zoloft® raises a child’s risk of being born with a limb reduction deficit by a factor of 3.9, and maternal use of Celexa® raises a child’s risk of being born with a limb reduction deficit four fold.

We are here to help!

Because warning for increased risk for these birth defects is omitted from the labeling of Zoloft® and Celexa® the pharmaceutical companies that manufacture these drugs may be held liable for the injuries they incur.  If you used one of these SSRIs or another SSRI such as Paxil®, Prozac®, or Lexapro® please do not hesitate to contact our team of highly skilled pharmaceutical lawyers at (855) 452-5529 or by e-mail at justinian@dangerousdrugs.us for a free, no-obligation consultation.

We have the experience and resources to go up against even the largest of pharmaceutical companies and win the justice your family deserves.  We are here to help you recover from the injury these dangerous drugs have caused.

Our SSRI Birth Defects Lawsuit Information page is a great place to start if you have any questions about SSRIs and Birth Defects.

 


[1] “CDC – Birth Defects, Upper and Lower Limb Reduction Defects – NCBDDD” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  US Department of Health and Human Services. Available at <http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/UL-LimbReductionDefects.html> Updated 25 February 2011, Accessed 31 January 2013

[2] Louik, C. et al. (2007) “First-Trimester Use of Selective Serotonin-Reuptake Inhibitors and the Risk of Birth Defects” The New England Journal of Medicine Vol. 365, No. 26; pp. 2675-2683

[3] “CDC – Birth Defects, Upper and Lower Limb Reduction Defects – NCBDDD” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  US Department of Health and Human Services. Available at <http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/UL-LimbReductionDefects.html> Updated 25 February 2011, Accessed 31 January 2013

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] Rosano A, Botto LD, Olney RS, Khoury MJ, Ritvanen A, Goujard J, et al. Limb defects associated with major congenital anomalies: clinical and epidemiological study from the International Clearinghouse for birth defects monitoring systems. Am J Med Genet. 2000;93: 110-16.